Living in Moray

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Moray Firth
The Moray Firth. (Stranger on the shore © Copyright (Des Colhoun) / CC BY-SA 2.0

In the North East of Scotland lies the famous county of Moray. Not only is it the birthplace of Macbeth, it is also known for its malt whisky, temperate climate and varied landscapes. There are plenty of beautiful towns and villages in Moray, each with their own charms and attractions. You really are spoilt for choice here when it comes to finding a new place to live.

Moray is, perhaps, best known for its bottlenose dolphins. Around 130 are thought to live in the Moray Firth, making it one of the best places in Europe to go dolphin spotting. Harbour seals are also common in the area; when they're not chasing boats they're laying on mudbanks and sandy shores. If you head further out into the firth, you'll be able to see porpoises, white-beaked dolphins, pilot whales, minke whales and even killer whales on rare occasions.

In fact, the entire coastline is rich in animal and plant life. Otters call the area home, as do ospreys in the summer. Moray's beaches are dotted with rare oyster plants, which brighten up the pale shingle. On the southern shore is one of the largest sand dune systems in Britain, while atop it is Culbin Forest - a beautiful place to visit.

Even Moray's busy capital, Elgin, is resplendent and full of history. It's retained a lot of its medieval past, as the bustling main street leads onto a charming old cobbled market place. The buildings are beautiful too - it's understandable that some call it one of the most picturesque towns in North Scotland.

Keen anglers will be pleased to know that Moray is the perfect place to go sea fishing. Plus, the world famous River Spey is ideal for salmon and trout fishing, as is the River Findhorn. If fishing isn't your thing, Moray also boasts 16 golf courses, eight five-star visitor attractions and the opportunity to do a host of outdoor sports, including climbing, winter skiing, water skiing, hill walking, hiking and horse-riding.

History buffs can instead enjoy the many historical castles, buildings and sites scattered across the county, as the area is steeped in heritage. If you're a big fan of whisky, you're in luck - Moray is home to over half of Scotland's malt whisky distilleries. It's also the only place you can take part in a malt whisky trail in the whole world. Consider food your passion? Cullen is home to the famous traditional Scottish dish Cullen Skink, a thick soup consisting of smoked haddock, onions and potatoes.

Beach bums can find the most beautiful and sandy beaches in Burghead, Lossiemouth and Hopeman. Whether you love simply walking barefoot across the sands, going dolphin spotting or surfing in the sunshine, living in one of these coastal villages or towns is a must.

You'll never be bored or stuck for things to do here, and we truly think you won't find a better place to settle down.

 

 

 

 

 

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